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Right on target: Light hybrid molecule stop tumor growth in mice

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
A team of scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', the Moscow Technological University (MIREA) and the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University has experimentally proved the effectiveness of the formerly suggested 'light' method in oncotherapy. In a series of laboratory preclinical tests, the tumor growth stopped in 70 percent of mice, treated according to the innovative scheme. The results are presented in Pharmaceutics journal.

Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis. That's because doctors lack a simple, accurate and inexpensive test for it. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are getting much closer to developing the elusive blood test for AD.

Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children. When a burn patient enters the clinic, doctors use factors such as the depth and size of the burn, as well as the time required for skin healing--or re-epithelialization--to determine the best course of treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research have found another, possibly more accurate way to classify burn severity: analyzing proteins in blister fluid.

Scientists from TU Dresden search for new methods to cure neurodegenerative diseases

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Behavioural experiments confirm: Additional neurons improve brain function.

How molecules teeter in a laser field

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced. This very general effect underlies diverse physical phenomena. Now scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) report on an experiment in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, where the dependence of the driven-dipole response on the bound state of an electron in a methyl iodine molecule is revealed.

Global change could also affect hake fisheries in Tierra del Fuego

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
A new scientific study suggests snoek (Thyrsites atun) can recolonize the marine area of the Beagle Channel and South-Western Atlantic waters, an area in the American continent where this species competed with the hake (Merluccius sp.) to hunt preys in warmer periods. The conclusions open a new scene of potential changes that can affect trophic networks in this marine region due the effect of the rise of ocean temperatures.

Whole genome sequencing method may speed personalized treatment of drug-resistant infections

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that rapid resistance gene sequencing technology can accurately speed the identification of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains that sicken and kill some patients. A report on a proof of concept study, published in the January 2019 issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, suggests the technology has the potential to hasten the 'personalized' choice of antibiotics critically ill patients need.

Russian scientists creating new tools for diagnosing cancer

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
A group of scientists from Russia's Ural Federal University, headed by Professor Grigory Zyryanov, synthesized a group of multi-purpose fluorophores. The scientists told about the content and results of their research on the unique technology in a respected international scientific journal "Dyes and Pigments".

A new way to transfer energy between cells

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Researchers have described a new method for the transmission of electrons between proteins that refutes the evidence from experiments until now. This process, involved in the generation of energy in both animal and plant cells, will permit better understanding of the behavior of proteins in the cells, as well as giving a deeper understanding of the energy dysfunctions that cause diseases.

Scientists confirm pair of skeletons are from same early hominin species

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Separate skeletons suggested to be from different early hominin species are, in fact, from the same species, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a comprehensive analysis of remains first discovered a decade ago.

Study highlights lack of fair access to urban green spaces

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
People with higher incomes and more education tend to have greater access to urban green spaces than their less privileged neighbors, a new University of British Columbia study of parks and greenery in 10 major North American cities has found.

Genetic variants implicated in development of schizophrenia

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Genetic variants damaging neurotransmitter receptor implicated in development of schizophrenia.Genetic variants which prevent a neurotransmitter receptor from working properly have been implicated in the development of schizophrenia, according to research by the UCL Genetics Institute.

Epigenetics contribute to male and female differences in fear memory

EurekAlert! - Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
In a mouse model of traumatic memory, male mice recall fear-related memories better than female mice, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry.

Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing 180 in Gulf of Mexico

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. The finding adds new insight into how extreme climate change can directly impact fundamental geological processes and how those impacts play out across different environments.

Democratic governors have bold ideas to transform health care: Harvard researchers

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Republican and Democratic governors have strikingly different visions for the future of health care, according to a new analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health. While Republican leaders favor maintaining or shrinking public health insurance programs, Democratic leaders are advancing several new proposals to expand public coverage, including 'public option' and single-payer health reforms.

Poll: Majority of millennials do not like Trump, Twitter

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new national poll of millennials looks at opinions on President Trump, social media, key issues and potential 2020 presidential candidates.

Immune cell clues offer hope to hypertension patients, study suggests

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Scientists have pinpointed cells in the immune system that could be key to tackling high blood pressure. The findings also shed light on current medications that could increase risk of the disorder, which affects more than 12 million people in the UK.

Just like flipping a switch -- in only half a picosecond

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand how fast it is -- watches count in seconds, sporting games are timed in 10ths of a second, and light travels just under 12 inches in one-billionth of a second. Spin flips are faster.

Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E.coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels.

Unintended side effects: antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiome dysregulates skeletal health

EurekAlert! - Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Diet and exercise regulate the accrual of bone mass, but some evidence suggests the microbiome may also play a role. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina examined how the gut microbiome impacts skeletal health and what happens when the system is perturbed. They showed that antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiota induced a pro-inflammatory response that led to increased osteoclast activity and suppressed bone mass accrual in the post-pubertal developing skeleton.

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