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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Black women more likely to skip crucial breast cancer treatments

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that black women are more likely to skip hormone therapy treatments, also known as endocrine therapy, for breast cancer.

Synthetic organelle shows how tiny puddle-organs in our cells work

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Imagine your liver being just a big puddle. Some organelles in your cells are exactly that including prominent ones like the nucleolus. Now a synthetic organelle engineered in a lab at Georgia Tech shows how such puddle organs can carry out complex life-sustaining reaction chains.

To improve auto coatings, new tests do more than scratch the surface

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Know that sickening feeling when you find your car banged up by a runaway shopping cart? It may become just a bad memory if auto body manufacturers make use of a new suite of tests developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and three industry partners. Data from these tests could eventually help your vehicle's exterior better defend itself against dings, dents, scratches and things that go bump on the highway.

Neutrons produce first direct 3D maps of water during cell membrane fusion

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
New 3D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion. Using neutron diffraction at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, researchers have made the first direct observations of water in lipid bilayers used to model cell membrane fusion.

The extirpation of species outside protected areas

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world -- raising the risk of global extinction -- due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL. Researchers analyzed biodiversity in the peninsula of Thailand, Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Bali, one of the world's most biologically degraded regions. They found that up to 25 percent of heavy-bodied ground-feeding birds have been made locally extinct in the region.

The BMJ questions transparency of information surrounding safety of Pandemrix vaccine

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
An investigation published by The BMJ today raises fundamental questions about the transparency of information surrounding the safety of GlaxoSmithKline's Pandemrix vaccine used in 2009-2010.

Most nations falling short of UN targets to cut premature deaths from chronic diseases

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
People in the UK, US and China have a higher risk of dying early from conditions like cancer, heart disease and stroke than people in Italy, France, South Korea and Australia.

More than half of countries are not on track to meet global targets for chronic diseases

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Peer-reviewed / Modelling and review.Cancers, cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes were responsible for 12.5 million deaths among people aged 30-70 years worldwide in 2016.Warning as more than half of all countries are not on track to achieve a UN target to reduce by a third the rate of premature deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 2030.

Overwhelming evidence shows hepatitis C treatment effective for people who inject drugs

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Researchers are calling on an end to discriminatory health and illicit drugs policies, based on overwhelming evidence that new hepatitis C therapies are effective at curing the virus in people who inject drugs.

ACA health insurance ads targeted younger, healthier consumers from 2013 to 2016

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
The themes in television advertisements for health insurance plans have shifted over time, possibly reflecting the shrinking pool of health plans offered through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as well as rising plan premiums.

Smart pills dumb down medical care, experts warn

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have published a paper in the American Journal of Bioethics that cautions health care providers and policymakers to slow down when it comes to allowing this technology in patient care settings.

Study: Commitment to democratic values predict climate change concern

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Commitment to democratic values is the strongest predictor of climate change concern globally, Georgia State University faculty have found in a new study comparing climate change attitudes across 36 countries, including the US.

Study documents poor mental and physical health in rural borderland community members

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
The borderlands between the United States and Mexico are home to numerous Mexican and Central American rural communities, with many members living in poverty and frustrated by limited access to basic resources. A study on inequalities and health among foreign-born Latinos in rural borderland communities, led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside, has found that this population is vulnerable to high stress that negatively impacts its mental and physical health.

TINY cancer detection device proves effective in Uganda testing

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Its name is an acronym used to convey its size, but researchers at Cornell Engineering and Weill Cornell Medicine are hoping their hand-held cancer detection device's impact in the developing world is anything but small.

Genomic dark matter activity connects Parkinson's and psychiatric diseases

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Using a new technique known as laser-capture RNA seq, that involves cutting out dopamine neurons from a human brain section with a laser, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School have cataloged more than 70,000 novel elements active in these brain cells. Their results are published this week in Nature Neuroscience.

Investigational steroid mirrors prednisone's benefits while taming its side effects

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
A head-to-head trial comparing the decades-old steroid, prednisone, and a promising new steroid, vamorolone, finds both act on the same key set of genetic pathways involved in controlling inflammation, indicates a new study led by Children's National Health System researchers. However, the study suggests the new investigational steroid doesn't activate several additional pathways involved in prednisone's bevy of undesirable side effects.

After EMR implementation, surgeons spend less time interacting with patients

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Implementing an electronic medical records (EMR) system at an orthopaedic clinic may have unanticipated effects on clinic efficiency and productivity - including a temporary increase in labor costs and a lasting reduction in time spent interacting with patients, reports a study in September 19, 2018 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Full, but still feasting: Mouse study reveals how urge to eat overpowers a signal to stop

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
A new study explores the mystery of what drives eating past the point of fullness, at the most basic level in the brain. It shows that two tiny clusters of cells battle for control of feeding behavior -- and the one that drives eating overpowers the one that says to stop. It also shows that the brain's own natural opioid system gets involved -- and that blocking it with the drug naloxone can stop over-eating.

NASA balloon mission captures electric blue clouds

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Scientists share mesmerizing new images of electric blue clouds from NASA's PMC Turbo balloon mission that flew in over the Arctic in July 2018.

A naturally occurring antibiotic active against drug-resistant tuberculosis

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
A naturally occurring antibiotic called kanglemycin A is effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, even in drug-resistant strains, according to an international team of researchers who used chemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography to show how the compound maintains its activity.

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