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Actualizado: hace 19 horas 29 mins

New properties of sulfur atom discovered

Jue, 12/13/2018 - 23:00
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. Researchers from the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have recently revealed new properties of one of its key elements: sulfur.

Low skilled, low paid workers of the world don't unite, research shows

Jue, 12/13/2018 - 23:00
Workers in low-skilled, low paid employment aren't prone to band together and form a common bond, new research has shown.

Stress in new mothers causes lasting health risks, depending on race, ethnicity, poverty

Jue, 12/13/2018 - 23:00
African-American women undergo more physical 'wear-and-tear' during the first year after giving birth than Latina and white women, a consequence that may have long-lasting health effects, according to a study of a diverse group of more than 2,400 low-income women. The study today (Friday, Dec. 14) in the week's American Journal of Perinatology involved women of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds who were interviewed and evaluated at five different clinical sites in the United States.

Melbourne geneticists make new discovery about how a baby's sex is determined

Jue, 12/13/2018 - 23:00
Medical researchers at Melbourne's Murdoch Children's Research Institute have made a new discovery about how a baby's sex is determined -- it's not just about the X-Y chromosomes, but involves a 'regulator' that increases or decreases the activity of genes which decide if we become male or female.

Exploring ways to reduce child deaths in low-income countries

Jue, 12/13/2018 - 23:00
In Mozambique, the probability of dying in the first month after hospital discharge is high, particularly for babies under three months of age, shows a study led by ISGlobal. The study also shows that an algorithm based on simple clinical parameters can identify those children at higher risk of dying and that would therefore benefit from follow-up after discharge. Implementation of these models could contribute to reducing child mortality in low-income countries.

To repair DNA damage, plants need good contractors

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Researchers at the Salk Institute report which genes are turned on or off, and in which order, to orchestrate the cellular processes required to protect and repair the genome in response to DNA damage. The research, appearing in PNAS, reveals the genetic framework controlling a complex biological process that has broad implications for understanding how plants in particular, and organisms in general, cope with DNA damage to ensure long-term health and fitness.

Protein involved in nematode stress response identified

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
When humans experience stress, their inner turmoil may not be apparent to an outside observer. But many animals deal with stressful circumstances -- overcrowded conditions, not enough food -- by completely remodeling their bodies. These stress-induced forms, whether they offer a protective covering or more camouflaged coloration, can better withstand the challenge and help the animal survive until conditions improve.

NSU researchers uncover genetic marker, predictor of early relapse in pediatric ALL

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Researchers recently discovered that by testing the level of NER (nucleotide excision repair) gene expression, pediatric oncologists can determine the likelihood of early relapse (less than three years) in their acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. This

Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Two decades after the poisoning, Richard Ash--an associate research scientist in the University of Maryland's Department of Geology--used mass spectrometry to analyze several of Ling's hairs collected in 1994 and 1995 and established a timeline of her poisoning.

Face masks may protect hog farm workers and their household members from staph bacteria

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Face masks appear to provide important protection against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria for hog farm workers and for household members to whom they might otherwise transmit the bacteria, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Fitness instructors' comments shape women's body satisfaction

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
A new Northwestern University study found that while exercise, in this case, a 16-minute conditioning class, generally improved women's mood and body satisfaction, women felt even better if the instructor made motivational comments that focused on strength and health instead of on losing weight or changing the appearance of one's body.

Study scrutinizes hidden marketing relationships on social media

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Federal regulators require social media personalities to alert their viewers to promotional payments for products and gadgets shown on their channels, but an analysis by Princeton University researchers shows that such disclosures are rare.

In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Now, astronomers have used Hubble to nab a second 'very warm' Neptune (GJ 3470b) that is losing its atmosphere at a rate 100 times faster than that of GJ 436b. Both planets reside about 3.7 million miles from their star. That's one-tenth the distance between our solar system's innermost planet, Mercury, and the Sun.

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
A recent experimental study conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Washington University in St. Louis, and Columbia University on nanoscale collagen fibrils reported on, previously unforeseen, reasons why collagen is such a resilient material.

Genetically modified pigs resist infection with the classical swine fever virus

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Researchers have developed genetically modified pigs that are protected from classical swine fever virus (CSFV), according to a study published December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Hongsheng Ouyang of Jilin University, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, these pigs offer potential benefits over commercial vaccination and could reduce economic losses related to classical swine fever.

Plants' defense against insects is a bouquet

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
Michigan State University scholar Andrea Glassmire and her colleagues have revealed how the mixture of chemical weapons deployed by plants keeps marauding insects off base better than a one-note defense. This insight goes beyond the ecological convention of studying a single chemical compound a plant is packing and offers new ways to approach agricultural pest management. The research was published in today's Ecology Letters.

Study finds sewage bacteria lurking in Hudson river sediments

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
A new study shows that fecal bacteria from sewage are living in far greater quantities in near-shore sediments of the Hudson River than in the water itself. The river's pollution levels are generally monitored based on samples of clear water, not sediments, so the findings suggest that people stirring up the bottom while wading, swimming or kayaking may face previously unrecognized health risks.

Unpredictable food sources drive some bats to cooperatively search for food

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
With the help of novel miniature sensors, an international group of biologists that included University of Maryland Biology Professor Gerald Wilkinson found that bat species foraged socially if their food sources were in unpredictable locations, such as insect swarms or fish schools. In contrast, bats with food sources at fixed locations foraged on their own and did not communicate with one another while foraging or eating.

Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered by WSU researchers

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics.

MON 810 and NK603 GM Maize: No effects detected on rat health or metabolism

Mié, 12/12/2018 - 23:00
A diet based on MON 810 or NK603 transgenic maize does not affect the health or metabolism of rats, under the conditions of the GMO 90+1 project1. This unprecedented study performed by a research consortium led by Inra brought together a number of partners2, including Inserm. The research was performed as part of the Risk'OGM program funded by the French Ministry of Ecological and Inclusive Transition.

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