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From blue and black dresses to turbine blades -- here's the science of 'fake fake' photographs

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
A new study reveals the science behind a 'trick of the light' that made high-profile photographs of a major piece of public art appear 'faked' despite the pictures being entirely genuine. Vision science researchers found images of the 75-meter long wind turbine appeared super-imposed because of a visual illusion caused by light reflections playing on preconceived notions about how objects are lit in natural settings, altering the object's shape to the human eye.

Fighting forgery with paper fingerprints

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Newcastle University's cyber team have found a simple new way to prevent forgery of official documents such as certificates and passports.

Rates of suicide 'worrying' among people with autism, say experts

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Suicide rates among people with autism in England have reached 'worryingly' high levels, according to experts writing in the Lancet Psychiatry today.

Drug for refractory psoriatic arthritis shows promise in clinical trial

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
In a pivotal phase-3 clinical trial led by a Stanford University School of Medicine investigator, patients with psoriatic arthritis for whom standard-of-care pharmaceutical treatments have provided no lasting relief experienced a significant reduction in symptoms, including joint tenderness and swelling, when they were given a new drug.

Cuts to addiction services in England are 'a false economy' warns expert

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Cuts to addiction services in England are a false economy and are instead increasing pressure elsewhere in the NHS, warns an expert in The BMJ today.

Pregnancy complications linked to heightened heart disease risk in young adult offspring

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Complications of pregnancy, such as high blood pressure and infections, are linked to a heightened risk of early coronary heart disease in the young adult offspring, finds research published in the online journal Heart Asia.

Large market share for non-quality-assured malaria medicines in Africa

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
A new study of malaria medicine quality in eight sub-Saharan African countries has found a large and potentially growing market for non-quality-assured (QA) malaria treatments -- medicines not pre-approved by global health organizations -- as much as 20 percent of the private-sector market in Kenya, and 42 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Breakthrough in how autopsy practice is conducted worldwide

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Research suggests non-invasive post-mortem should become future standard first-line test in natural death.

Happiness and harm awareness could keep young people from drinking and smoking

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Promoting young people's levels of well-being and making them aware of the harms of smoking and drinking could keep them away from alcohol and cigarettes, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

Harvard Medical School expert calls for protection of critical gains made in cancer care under ACA

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
As the White House moves forward with its efforts to repeal Obamacare, it should strive to preserve -- and further boost -- these important advances, according to an introduction penned by Harvard Medical School professor health care policy expert Nancy Keating, who served as guest editor for the issue.

Labeling a bacterial cell 'jacket'

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
A team of researchers from the University of Delaware have discovered how to label and light the sugar backbone of a bacterial cell wall. The findings will advance immune system research.

How do blind cavefish find their way? The answer could be in their bones.

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Blind cavefish typically have skulls that bend slightly to the left. A study by UC suggests this orientation might help them find food as they navigate in a perpetual counter-clockwise direction around a cave.

South Sudan wildlife surviving civil war, but poaching and trafficking threats increase

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
The first aerial assessment of the impact of South Sudan's current civil war on the country's wildlife and other natural resources shows that significant wildlife populations have so far survived, but poaching and commercial wildlife trafficking are increasing, as well as illegal mining, timber harvesting and charcoal production, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) said in a report issued today.

Helping plants pump iron

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Salk researchers identify genetic variants that help plants grow in low-iron environments, which could improve crop yields.

Brain anatomy differs in people with 22q genetic risk for schizophrenia, autism

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Study characterizes, for the first time, brain differences between people with a specific genetic risk for schizophrenia and those at risk for autism, and the findings could help explain the biological underpinnings of these neuropsychiatric disorders.

Tree-climbing goats disperse seeds by spitting

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Spanish ecologists have observed an unusual way in which treetop-grazing goats may be benefiting the trees: the goats spit out the trees' seeds. Miguel Delibes, Irene Castañeda, and José M Fedriani reported their discovery in the latest Natural History Note in the May issue of the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

New study finds $1 million-per-mile economic impact of TVA reservoirs

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
UTIA researchers conducted in-depth surveys of visitors and property owners along three of TVA's 49 reservoirs -- Norris, Watts Bar and Chickamauga -- during Summer 2016. The study determined that the combination of aquatic recreation and waterfront property along the Tennessee Valley Authority's managed river system creates $11.9 billion of annual economic impact to the region -- the equivalent of $1 million per shoreline mile.

Genetic mutation studies help validate new strategy for reducing lipids, cholesterol

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
A new strategy -- an injectable antibody -- for lowering blood lipids and thereby potentially preventing coronary artery disease and other conditions caused by the build-up of fats, cholesterol, and other substances on the artery walls, is supported by findings from two new studies from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Racial disparities in risk of stroke

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
In a Correspondence in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers led by Susan Cheng, M.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, explore the impact of efforts to reduce risk factors for stroke in black patients.

Canada's largest hospital reports on year of medically assisted dying

Mar, 05/23/2017 - 22:00
Today, in the New England Journal of Medicine, the team from University Health Network in Toronto that developed the organization's protocol for medical assistance in dying (MAiD) describes UHN's approach and experience. This comes a year after Canada decriminalized medically assisted dying throughout the country.

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