Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 2 horas 23 mins

Screening could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Screening for osteoporosis could catch a quarter of hip fractures before they happen.A new study in The Lancet reveals that a simple questionnaire, combined with bone mineral density measurements for some, would help identify those at risk of hip fracture.The research, which involved more than 12,000 older women, found that screening through GP practices allowed patients to be targeted for treatment -- leading to a 28 percent reduction in hip fractures over five years.

Dementia with Lewy bodies: Unique genetic profile identified

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Dementia with Lewy bodies has a unique genetic profile, distinct from those of Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease, according to the first large-scale genetic study of this common type of dementia.The genome-wide association study, conducted by a UCL-led collaboration of 65 academics in 11 countries and funded by Alzheimer's Society and the Lewy Body Society, is published today in The Lancet Neurology.

Study prompts new ideas on cancers' origins

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Cancer therapies often target cells that grow and divide rapidly, such as stem cells, but in studying how stomach cancers occur, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that even when the stomach isn't able to make stem cells, other cells in the stomach can begin to divide and contribute to precancerous lesions.

Single-photon detector can count to 4

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Engineers have shown that a widely used method of detecting single photons can also count the presence of at least four photons at a time. The researchers say this discovery will unlock new capabilities in physics labs working in quantum information science around the world, while providing easier paths to developing quantum-based technologies.

UTA discovery could reduce cost, energy for high-speed Internet connections

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
UTA and University of Vermont researchers developed an optical medium in which multiple beams of light can autocorrect their properties without affecting other beams. This could lead to a dramatic reduction in the cost and energy consumption of high-speed internet communications.

BIDMC researchers use artificial intelligence to identify bacteria quickly and accurately

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Microscopes enhanced with artificial intelligence (AI) could help clinical microbiologists diagnose potentially deadly blood infections and improve patients' odds of survival, according to microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC).

Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center tested a method to reduce the adverse effects of evening ambient light exposure, while still allowing use of blue light-emitting devices.

A new theory to describe widely used material

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
LiU researcher Klas Tybrandt has put forward a theoretical model that explains the coupling between ions and electrons in the widely used conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The model has profound implications for applications in printed electronics, energy storage in paper, and bioelectronics.

Scientists win a gold metal for liquid behavior

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Researchers at University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science report the first direct observation of atoms moving in liquid by collaborating with National Institute of Materials Science. Using scanning transmission electron microscopy, they find that gold ions diffuse through ionic liquid by a phenomenon they describe as a 'cage-jump.' Image analysis determined the diffusion coefficient and activation energy of the diffusion. Quantification of liquid at the atomic level is expected to contribute to the design of energy efficient devices.

What does hair loss have to teach us about cancer metastasis?

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified a signaling pathway regulating cell migration and metastasis. Unexpected hair loss in a preclinical model helped them to identify the pathway. When cells within the skin that maintain hair follicles migrate too often, hair follicle maintenance is disrupted. Researchers speculated that this pathway might also play a role in cancer cell migration. Indeed, they showed that disrupting this pathway in preclinical models increased metastasis.

Nanodiscs catch misfolding proteins red-handed

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
When proteins misfold, accumulate and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells. Now, researchers, including University of Michigan biophysicists, have obtained a structural snapshot of these proteins when they are most toxic, detailing them down to the atomic level.

Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climate

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found.

Genetic instructions from mom set the pattern for embryonic development

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
A new study indicates an essential role for a maternally inherited gene in embryonic development. The study found that zebrafish that failed to inherit specific genetic instructions from mom developed fatal defects earlier in development, even if the fish could make their own version of the gene.

After searching 12 years for bipolar disorder's cause, U-M team concludes it has many

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Nearly 6 million Americans have bipolar disorder, and most have probably wondered why. After more than a decade of studying over 1,100 of them in-depth, a team of scientists has an answer -- or rather, seven answers.

How much can late Permian ecosystems tell us about modern Earth? A lot.

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
New paleontological research shows that during the late Permian, the equator was dry and desert-like, yet surprisingly a hotspot for biodiversity. Similarly to modern rainforests, equator ecosystems were home to a unique diversity of species, including those both anciently and newly evolved. After the late Permian extinction, this diversity was decimated, and the climate change event that triggered an extinction back then is informative as we move forward with protecting our planet's species diversity.

Error-free into the quantum computer age

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
A study led by physicists at Swansea University in Wales, carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors.

Erectile dysfunction is red flag for silent early cardiovascular disease

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Despite decades long prevention and treatment efforts, cardiovascular (CV) disease continues to be the leading cause of death worldwide. Early detection of CV disease can allow for interventions to prevent heart attack and stroke, including smoking cessation, medications such as a statins, blood pressure control, weight management, exercise, and improved diet. A new study published online first today in the journal Vascular Medicine, focuses on a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease that rarely receives attention -- erectile dysfunction.

Heavy-petroleum fuels raising vanadium emissions

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Human emissions of the potentially harmful trace metal vanadium into Earth's atmosphere have spiked sharply since the start of the 21st century due in large part to industry's growing use of heavy oils, tar sands, bitumen and petroleum coke for energy, a new Duke study finds. These emissions now exceed those from all natural sources combined. Growing evidence suggests exposure to vanadium-rich aerosols can impair respiratory functions and exacerbate conditions such as asthma or COPD.

How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
According to a new study, almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse. The study also offers ideas on how agriculture can change to become a part of the solution from being part of the problem.

NASA sees Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moving over the Philippines

Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak that revealed the western side of storm had moved into the southern and central Philippines. Infrared data revealed very cold cloud top temperatures with the potential for heavy rainfall.

Páginas